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The Economist

Oct 02 2021
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

Coronavirus data • To 6am GMT September 30th 2021

The world this week

China’s new reality • China’s president will be defined by his campaign to tame capitalism

From Big Bang to a whimper • Britain’s stockmarket is fading away. It can be revived

Uninspired • Japan deserves better than an inoffensive prime minister

She who must not be named • Why “woman” seems to be the hardest word

Ways and means • America will never have a European-style welfare state without a vAT

Working up an appetite • Consumers and governments should embrace new ways to make food

Letters

Britain’s sluggish stockmarket • Why London is no longer the world’s bourse

Who’s up, who’s down? • The decline of Britain’s stockmarket should be seen in a broader historical context

From whatever source derived • WASHINGTON, DC

Still stopping the steal • WASHINGTON, DC

The rest is history • Americans have forgotten how their government shaped Haiti

Term time • NEW YORK

Aggravated robbery • NEW YORK

Fulsome • LORTON, VIRGINIA

Green on brown • Renewable energy is growing fastest in conservative states. So why don’t Republicans love it?

A conservative crack-up • SÃO PAULO

Underwater atoms • Brazil might get nuclear-powered submarines before Australia

Between hope and fear • Can Chile’s constitutional convention defuse discontent?

A delicate balance • ISLAMABAD

Mission control • Afghan embassies don’t recognise the Taliban

Sub-prime minister • TOKYO

Laosy bets • A new report digs into China’s labyrinthine development loans

A raid against dissent • India’s government is using the taxman against opponents imagined and real

The people’s dictator • Xi Jinping’s clampdowns herald a tense political year in China

When China wants to be feared • Taking Canadian hostages was a message to America’s allies

Call me maybe • TEL AVIV

Fiddling while Carthage burns • DUBAI

One Qaddafi wasn’t enough • The fallen dictator’s son is plotting a comeback

Building bridges • KAMPALA

When the ANC withers • CAPE TOWN

Advantage Scholz • BERLIN

Putin in hiding • MOSCOW

Paris Philhellenic • France and Greece hedge their bets with a new defence pact

Roam work • LISBON

A very European election • A uniquely German campaign created unmistakably European results

Running on empty • What shortages and supply troubles reveal about Boris Johnson’s government

Change of plan • The government looks set to ditch its target for building lots more homes

A blustery week • Despite fierce opposition, Sir Keir Starmer is sailing the Labour Party in the right direction

Electric Motor City • The switch to battery power is the latest showdown between Detroit’s heavyweights

Out of the groove • The music industry is an unexpected victim of a plastics shortage

A key moment in capitalism • SAN FRANCISCO

Better not squash • Companies weed out middle managers at their peril

How bosses should write books • Business leaders are at risk of giving business writing a good name

The property complex • HONG KONG

The political premium • HONG KONG

Xi’s electric

Home truths • Why more curbs on risky lending will...


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Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

Coronavirus data • To 6am GMT September 30th 2021

The world this week

China’s new reality • China’s president will be defined by his campaign to tame capitalism

From Big Bang to a whimper • Britain’s stockmarket is fading away. It can be revived

Uninspired • Japan deserves better than an inoffensive prime minister

She who must not be named • Why “woman” seems to be the hardest word

Ways and means • America will never have a European-style welfare state without a vAT

Working up an appetite • Consumers and governments should embrace new ways to make food

Letters

Britain’s sluggish stockmarket • Why London is no longer the world’s bourse

Who’s up, who’s down? • The decline of Britain’s stockmarket should be seen in a broader historical context

From whatever source derived • WASHINGTON, DC

Still stopping the steal • WASHINGTON, DC

The rest is history • Americans have forgotten how their government shaped Haiti

Term time • NEW YORK

Aggravated robbery • NEW YORK

Fulsome • LORTON, VIRGINIA

Green on brown • Renewable energy is growing fastest in conservative states. So why don’t Republicans love it?

A conservative crack-up • SÃO PAULO

Underwater atoms • Brazil might get nuclear-powered submarines before Australia

Between hope and fear • Can Chile’s constitutional convention defuse discontent?

A delicate balance • ISLAMABAD

Mission control • Afghan embassies don’t recognise the Taliban

Sub-prime minister • TOKYO

Laosy bets • A new report digs into China’s labyrinthine development loans

A raid against dissent • India’s government is using the taxman against opponents imagined and real

The people’s dictator • Xi Jinping’s clampdowns herald a tense political year in China

When China wants to be feared • Taking Canadian hostages was a message to America’s allies

Call me maybe • TEL AVIV

Fiddling while Carthage burns • DUBAI

One Qaddafi wasn’t enough • The fallen dictator’s son is plotting a comeback

Building bridges • KAMPALA

When the ANC withers • CAPE TOWN

Advantage Scholz • BERLIN

Putin in hiding • MOSCOW

Paris Philhellenic • France and Greece hedge their bets with a new defence pact

Roam work • LISBON

A very European election • A uniquely German campaign created unmistakably European results

Running on empty • What shortages and supply troubles reveal about Boris Johnson’s government

Change of plan • The government looks set to ditch its target for building lots more homes

A blustery week • Despite fierce opposition, Sir Keir Starmer is sailing the Labour Party in the right direction

Electric Motor City • The switch to battery power is the latest showdown between Detroit’s heavyweights

Out of the groove • The music industry is an unexpected victim of a plastics shortage

A key moment in capitalism • SAN FRANCISCO

Better not squash • Companies weed out middle managers at their peril

How bosses should write books • Business leaders are at risk of giving business writing a good name

The property complex • HONG KONG

The political premium • HONG KONG

Xi’s electric

Home truths • Why more curbs on risky lending will...


Expand title description text