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The Economist

Sep 03 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

Politics

Business

The disunited states • Far from being laboratories of democracy, American states are now Petri dishes of polarisation

Keeping the lights on • How to stop Europe’s energy crunch spiralling into an economic crisis

The man who ended an empire • He liberated millions, even if he didn’t set out to

Zoom fatigue • The tech darlings of the pandemic have crashed and burned. But there are winners, too

Get ready for the rains • What Pakistan needs to learn from Bangladesh

Free the bulldozers • Britain’s growth problem won’t be fixed until its absurd planning rules are reformed

Letters

A house divided • DALLAS AND SACRAMENTOAmerican policy is splintering state by state, with profound consequences

Hot and not too bothered • LAS VEGASMany Americans are still not taking extreme heat seriously enough

Rocky Mountain high ground • PUEBLOThe contest could show Republicans an alternative to Trumpism

ADDing up • CHICAGOA new boom in online mental-health treatment causes concerns

Out of a jam • NEW YORKAmerica’s most congested city may be on the verge of ending gridlock

A rapacity for carapaces • Crab blood, still widely used to test American drugs, is growing scarcer

See life • From whale to oyster to human, animals are returning to New York City’s waters

Narco nastiness • MEXICO CITYSeveral violent episodes illustrate Mexico’s growing problem with gangs

Dusty weather • RABINALTraditional farming practices are being embraced by some in the dry corridor

Mule got mail • QUITOWhat to do in a country with a backlog of 1m letters and parcels?

Under water • ISLAMABADA country reeling from economic and political crises is hit by the worst floods in recent history

Daughters of the soil • NONSANGrowing numbers of young Koreans are leaving the cities for farms

Grid locked • VIENTIANECan South-East Asian countries learn to share power?

Decline and punishment • FUCHU AND TOCHIGIJapan’s prisons attempt to adapt to their ageing inmates

Rule the airwaves • A tycoon’s bid for a big Indian news channel bodes ill for media freedom

The perils of “peak China” • WASHINGTON, DCA new book warns America that a weakening China is more likely to invade Taiwan than a strong one

Just passing by • American warships transit the Taiwan Strait

Took you long enough • TAIPEIA long-awaited report condemns China’s actions in Xinjiang

An art factory in decline • They can paint like Van Gogh, but few think they are masters

Coalitions of the unwilling • BETHLEHEM AND JOHANNESBURGThe anc is predicted to lose its parliamentary majority in 2024, ending three decades of dominance. Parties will have to team up to form a government

Underwater cities • DAKAREvery year west African urbanites face a watery nightmare

Preparing for a long fight • PEMBAA brutal insurgency is proving more resilient than expected

Why sun and wind need harnessing • CAIROThe government is keen on solar power but its citizens less so

Militias amok • AMMANDespite his vanishing act, Muqtada al-Sadr has never been more present

The game’s afoot • KYIVUkraine begins a long-awaited counter-offensive in the south

Taking the fight to the next level • ROMEA tough anti-mafia prosecutor looks set to enter parliament

Only yes is yes • MADRIDThe home of...


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Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

Politics

Business

The disunited states • Far from being laboratories of democracy, American states are now Petri dishes of polarisation

Keeping the lights on • How to stop Europe’s energy crunch spiralling into an economic crisis

The man who ended an empire • He liberated millions, even if he didn’t set out to

Zoom fatigue • The tech darlings of the pandemic have crashed and burned. But there are winners, too

Get ready for the rains • What Pakistan needs to learn from Bangladesh

Free the bulldozers • Britain’s growth problem won’t be fixed until its absurd planning rules are reformed

Letters

A house divided • DALLAS AND SACRAMENTOAmerican policy is splintering state by state, with profound consequences

Hot and not too bothered • LAS VEGASMany Americans are still not taking extreme heat seriously enough

Rocky Mountain high ground • PUEBLOThe contest could show Republicans an alternative to Trumpism

ADDing up • CHICAGOA new boom in online mental-health treatment causes concerns

Out of a jam • NEW YORKAmerica’s most congested city may be on the verge of ending gridlock

A rapacity for carapaces • Crab blood, still widely used to test American drugs, is growing scarcer

See life • From whale to oyster to human, animals are returning to New York City’s waters

Narco nastiness • MEXICO CITYSeveral violent episodes illustrate Mexico’s growing problem with gangs

Dusty weather • RABINALTraditional farming practices are being embraced by some in the dry corridor

Mule got mail • QUITOWhat to do in a country with a backlog of 1m letters and parcels?

Under water • ISLAMABADA country reeling from economic and political crises is hit by the worst floods in recent history

Daughters of the soil • NONSANGrowing numbers of young Koreans are leaving the cities for farms

Grid locked • VIENTIANECan South-East Asian countries learn to share power?

Decline and punishment • FUCHU AND TOCHIGIJapan’s prisons attempt to adapt to their ageing inmates

Rule the airwaves • A tycoon’s bid for a big Indian news channel bodes ill for media freedom

The perils of “peak China” • WASHINGTON, DCA new book warns America that a weakening China is more likely to invade Taiwan than a strong one

Just passing by • American warships transit the Taiwan Strait

Took you long enough • TAIPEIA long-awaited report condemns China’s actions in Xinjiang

An art factory in decline • They can paint like Van Gogh, but few think they are masters

Coalitions of the unwilling • BETHLEHEM AND JOHANNESBURGThe anc is predicted to lose its parliamentary majority in 2024, ending three decades of dominance. Parties will have to team up to form a government

Underwater cities • DAKAREvery year west African urbanites face a watery nightmare

Preparing for a long fight • PEMBAA brutal insurgency is proving more resilient than expected

Why sun and wind need harnessing • CAIROThe government is keen on solar power but its citizens less so

Militias amok • AMMANDespite his vanishing act, Muqtada al-Sadr has never been more present

The game’s afoot • KYIVUkraine begins a long-awaited counter-offensive in the south

Taking the fight to the next level • ROMEA tough anti-mafia prosecutor looks set to enter parliament

Only yes is yes • MADRIDThe home of...


Expand title description text