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The Economist

Sep 10 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

Politics

Business

The man who would be Trump • Jair Bolsonaro threatens democracy in Latin America’s biggest country

Crunch time • How to tackle Europe’s energy crisis without destroying public finances and power markets

Meet our midterm model • The Republican Party is set to do worse in November than it should. Donald Trump’s influence is to blame

The mighty dollar • Why the dollar is strong—and what might threaten its supremacy in the long run

Spying on sewage could save lives • Wastewater surveillance is a cheap tool to spot health problems, but it is open to abuse

Can Liz Truss fix Britain? • The new prime minister must eschew pantomime radicalism if she is to succeed

Letters

Trump’s tropical disciple • RIO DE JANEIROJair Bolsonaro is poised to lose the Brazilian election. He will not go quietly

Split decision • Our statistical forecast favours Republicans to take the House, and Democrats to keep the Senate

High and dry • JACKSONThe water crisis in Mississippi’s largest city is a harbinger of worse

The best medicine • CHICAGOMore American hospitals are beginning to take nutrition seriously

Roeing forward • DETROITThe demise of Roe v Wade is firing up the Democrats in the final stretch before the general elections

Reading between the bars • Prisons are using technology to improve inmates’ education

Joe Biden’s big gamble • In taking on Donald Trump, the president may make saving democracy look partisan

Second time’s a charm • SANTIAGOCommon sense triumphs as Chileans reject a new constitution

The gun that failed to fire • An attack on Argentina’s vice-president raises unanswered questions

The middle rail • BISHKEK, KYRGYZSTANThe balance of power in Central Asia is shifting

A noisy noise annoys Hanoi • HANOIThe capital’s residents abhor the return of war-era loudspeakers

The other travel chaos • DELHI AND SINGAPOREOverwhelmed Western consulates are wrecking Asians’ travel plans

Shotime • After 150 years of baseball, Japan has a star to rival Babe Ruth

Greasing the ladders • BEIJINGChina’s covid controls are making it harder for strivers to get ahead

Testing their patience • BEIJINGThe public’s frustration with the zero-covid policy is growing

Travelin’ man • The president plans his first foreign trip since the start of the pandemic

Too rich for some • BEIJINGThe government bites down on high-priced pastries

LAND, OIL AND ICE • ANCHORAGE, FAIRBANKS, KOTZEBUE AND THE NATIONAL PETROLEUM RESERVE IN ALASKA Glimpsing the world’s past and future in the Arctic

An unenriching debate • DUBAI AND JERUSALEMEndless nuclear talks with Iran are bordering on the absurd

Long-distance marriages • Lebanese seeking civil ceremonies are getting wed online

Bulldozing history • JEDDAHMake way for modernity

Local heroes • KAMPALAAfrican creators reach for the sky

The winner loses • The ruling regime has been weakened by its own habitual cheating

Preventing the big chill • BERLIN, PARIS AND ROMEThe eu tries to counter Russia’s energy weapon

Western wind • DUBLINDreams of exporting green power

A breakthrough • Ukraine’s army pierces Russian lines

Big Brothers • ASCOLI PICENOThe nativists likely to govern Italy

Thursday’s children • The war has thrown Ukraine’s surrogacy industry...


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Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

Politics

Business

The man who would be Trump • Jair Bolsonaro threatens democracy in Latin America’s biggest country

Crunch time • How to tackle Europe’s energy crisis without destroying public finances and power markets

Meet our midterm model • The Republican Party is set to do worse in November than it should. Donald Trump’s influence is to blame

The mighty dollar • Why the dollar is strong—and what might threaten its supremacy in the long run

Spying on sewage could save lives • Wastewater surveillance is a cheap tool to spot health problems, but it is open to abuse

Can Liz Truss fix Britain? • The new prime minister must eschew pantomime radicalism if she is to succeed

Letters

Trump’s tropical disciple • RIO DE JANEIROJair Bolsonaro is poised to lose the Brazilian election. He will not go quietly

Split decision • Our statistical forecast favours Republicans to take the House, and Democrats to keep the Senate

High and dry • JACKSONThe water crisis in Mississippi’s largest city is a harbinger of worse

The best medicine • CHICAGOMore American hospitals are beginning to take nutrition seriously

Roeing forward • DETROITThe demise of Roe v Wade is firing up the Democrats in the final stretch before the general elections

Reading between the bars • Prisons are using technology to improve inmates’ education

Joe Biden’s big gamble • In taking on Donald Trump, the president may make saving democracy look partisan

Second time’s a charm • SANTIAGOCommon sense triumphs as Chileans reject a new constitution

The gun that failed to fire • An attack on Argentina’s vice-president raises unanswered questions

The middle rail • BISHKEK, KYRGYZSTANThe balance of power in Central Asia is shifting

A noisy noise annoys Hanoi • HANOIThe capital’s residents abhor the return of war-era loudspeakers

The other travel chaos • DELHI AND SINGAPOREOverwhelmed Western consulates are wrecking Asians’ travel plans

Shotime • After 150 years of baseball, Japan has a star to rival Babe Ruth

Greasing the ladders • BEIJINGChina’s covid controls are making it harder for strivers to get ahead

Testing their patience • BEIJINGThe public’s frustration with the zero-covid policy is growing

Travelin’ man • The president plans his first foreign trip since the start of the pandemic

Too rich for some • BEIJINGThe government bites down on high-priced pastries

LAND, OIL AND ICE • ANCHORAGE, FAIRBANKS, KOTZEBUE AND THE NATIONAL PETROLEUM RESERVE IN ALASKA Glimpsing the world’s past and future in the Arctic

An unenriching debate • DUBAI AND JERUSALEMEndless nuclear talks with Iran are bordering on the absurd

Long-distance marriages • Lebanese seeking civil ceremonies are getting wed online

Bulldozing history • JEDDAHMake way for modernity

Local heroes • KAMPALAAfrican creators reach for the sky

The winner loses • The ruling regime has been weakened by its own habitual cheating

Preventing the big chill • BERLIN, PARIS AND ROMEThe eu tries to counter Russia’s energy weapon

Western wind • DUBLINDreams of exporting green power

A breakthrough • Ukraine’s army pierces Russian lines

Big Brothers • ASCOLI PICENOThe nativists likely to govern Italy

Thursday’s children • The war has thrown Ukraine’s surrogacy industry...


Expand title description text