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The Economist

Sep 24 2022
Magazine

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

Politics

Business

Boom time in the Gulf • An energy crisis and fresh alliances are making the region more powerful—and more volatile

Putin doubles down • Ukraine has a window of opportunity to push back the invaders before more arrive

Truss’s rusty Reaganomics • Transplanting 40-year-old economic policy from America to Britain will not work

Thinking outside the box • Neuroscience is experiencing a renaissance. Not before time

Should Europe worry? • How afraid should it be of Giorgia Meloni, the woman expected to be Italy’s next leader?

Letters

Global energy flows Docks, stocks and many floating barrels • DOHA, DUBAI AND SHARJAHRussia’s war has rammed a gun barrel into the mechanics of the energy trade. A great re-engineering is under way

Wooing the waverers • NEW YORKA strengthened Joe Biden warns of global disorder if Russia wins in Ukraine. But many countries want to stay out of geopolitical rivalries

Bad politics? • WASHINGTON, DCRepublicans’ proposed abortion ban could backfire

Et tu, New York • WASHINGTON, DCThe former president faces a sweeping new lawsuit

Claws out • PORTLAND, MAINEMaine’s lobster industry is feeling the pinch

Trans plans • New standards of care for transgender people are causing concerns

Revving up • DETROITMotor City is once again betting on the car industry to ride to its rescue

In praise of the deep state • Despite common criticism, there is plenty of good news about American government

The unknown known • SÃO PAULOThe Economist interviews Lula, the front-runner to be Brazil’s next president

Bukele’s big re-election lie • Abolishing term limits is the road to tyranny

Chain reaction • BAC NINHTrade wars, a pandemic and deglobalisation have all failed to stop Vietnam’s rise. Now comes the hard part

Unholy spirit • DELHIIndia’s capital has run out of booze

Pass the button • SEOULKim Jong Un considers devolving power over his nuclear arsenal

Border disorder • ALMATYDeadly fighting erupts between Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan

The kaleidoscope turns • Why Narendra Modi criticised Vladimir Putin in Samarkand

The widening gap • Despite recent reforms, many internal migrants will remain second-class citizens

A bit more Mao-like • BEIJINGHow Xi Jinping might change the Communist Party’s constitution

Still frosty • Where things stand between Asia’s two biggest countries

The Abraham economy • DUBAI AND TEL AVIVSince the Abraham accords were signed in 2020, Israel’s trade and security ties with Arab states have blossomed

Burning their hijabs • Women rise up against the Islamic Republic

Hostages to fortune • DAKARA junta kidnaps friendly foreign soldiers, imperilling a un peacekeeping mission

Escaping the dead hand of dictatorship • MSUNDWETwo years after saving its democracy, Malawi remains the world’s poorest peaceful country

The Brothers are coming • ROMEWhat will Italy’s next government be like?

Halfway measure • Vladimir Putin stops short of a full call-up of troops

The guns do the talking • Renewed fighting in the Caucasus shows Russia’s waning influence

The Reverse Luxembourg • If national vetoes are to be allowed in Europe, a way must be found to stem their abuse

The smoked-salmon offensive • After a frosty decade, business leaders are warming to...


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Formats

OverDrive Magazine

Languages

English

The Economist is a global weekly magazine written for those who share an uncommon interest in being well and broadly informed. Each issue explores domestic and international issues, business, finance, current affairs, science, technology and the arts.

The Economist

Politics

Business

Boom time in the Gulf • An energy crisis and fresh alliances are making the region more powerful—and more volatile

Putin doubles down • Ukraine has a window of opportunity to push back the invaders before more arrive

Truss’s rusty Reaganomics • Transplanting 40-year-old economic policy from America to Britain will not work

Thinking outside the box • Neuroscience is experiencing a renaissance. Not before time

Should Europe worry? • How afraid should it be of Giorgia Meloni, the woman expected to be Italy’s next leader?

Letters

Global energy flows Docks, stocks and many floating barrels • DOHA, DUBAI AND SHARJAHRussia’s war has rammed a gun barrel into the mechanics of the energy trade. A great re-engineering is under way

Wooing the waverers • NEW YORKA strengthened Joe Biden warns of global disorder if Russia wins in Ukraine. But many countries want to stay out of geopolitical rivalries

Bad politics? • WASHINGTON, DCRepublicans’ proposed abortion ban could backfire

Et tu, New York • WASHINGTON, DCThe former president faces a sweeping new lawsuit

Claws out • PORTLAND, MAINEMaine’s lobster industry is feeling the pinch

Trans plans • New standards of care for transgender people are causing concerns

Revving up • DETROITMotor City is once again betting on the car industry to ride to its rescue

In praise of the deep state • Despite common criticism, there is plenty of good news about American government

The unknown known • SÃO PAULOThe Economist interviews Lula, the front-runner to be Brazil’s next president

Bukele’s big re-election lie • Abolishing term limits is the road to tyranny

Chain reaction • BAC NINHTrade wars, a pandemic and deglobalisation have all failed to stop Vietnam’s rise. Now comes the hard part

Unholy spirit • DELHIIndia’s capital has run out of booze

Pass the button • SEOULKim Jong Un considers devolving power over his nuclear arsenal

Border disorder • ALMATYDeadly fighting erupts between Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan

The kaleidoscope turns • Why Narendra Modi criticised Vladimir Putin in Samarkand

The widening gap • Despite recent reforms, many internal migrants will remain second-class citizens

A bit more Mao-like • BEIJINGHow Xi Jinping might change the Communist Party’s constitution

Still frosty • Where things stand between Asia’s two biggest countries

The Abraham economy • DUBAI AND TEL AVIVSince the Abraham accords were signed in 2020, Israel’s trade and security ties with Arab states have blossomed

Burning their hijabs • Women rise up against the Islamic Republic

Hostages to fortune • DAKARA junta kidnaps friendly foreign soldiers, imperilling a un peacekeeping mission

Escaping the dead hand of dictatorship • MSUNDWETwo years after saving its democracy, Malawi remains the world’s poorest peaceful country

The Brothers are coming • ROMEWhat will Italy’s next government be like?

Halfway measure • Vladimir Putin stops short of a full call-up of troops

The guns do the talking • Renewed fighting in the Caucasus shows Russia’s waning influence

The Reverse Luxembourg • If national vetoes are to be allowed in Europe, a way must be found to stem their abuse

The smoked-salmon offensive • After a frosty decade, business leaders are warming to...


Expand title description text